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Best Gaming Mouse for Large Hands

Looking for the best gaming mouse for large hands? then here is the solution.

A great gaming mouse is essential if you are looking to get into PC gaming seriously. But if you have large hands, it might be a bit of a struggle to find a mouse that feels comfortable to use for long raids or tough operations with musketeers. Thankfully, there are plenitude of excellent options on the request that vary in size and features. Then are the stylish gaming mice for big hands.
One of the biggest problems facing large-handed gamers is simply chancing a mouse that feels comfortable to use. After all, nothing throws you off your game like having to scrunch your hand up to use a small gaming mouse. Sound like a problem you ’ve faced before? If that’s the case, it’s time to start looking into the stylish gaming mice for large hands.

No, you ’re not going to find a bigger gaming mouse fellow of a Logitech G Pro X Superlight or any of the popular ultralight mice right now. That’s just not going to be. But there are still a sprinkle of great larger gaming mice that are worth checking out, so let’s get right to it.

Here is the list of the best gaming mouse for large hands:

1. RAZER DEATHADDER V2 PRO

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When it comes to large gaming mice, the Razer DeathAdder shape is one of the classics of the style. Its curvy, right-handed design fits nicely in a win grip, allowing the fritters to rest in a more relaxed manner than ambidextrous mice. In that sense, it’s not too different from other mice on our list.

But there are a couple of reasons the V2 Pro is our overall fave. First is its slightly narrower grip range, which makes it a safer recommendation for a variety of grip styles. Secondly, the V2 Pro has ultramodern features that you do n’t always get on large gaming mice. These include 100 PTFE bases, optic switches, wireless operation, and fairly featherlight construction.
That final point is arguably the most charming part. The aged DeathAdder mice tended to weigh around 100 grams (3.5 oz), but the V2 Pro comes in at a fairly svelte 88 grams (3.1 oz). It’s still significantly heavier than the stylish featherlight gaming mice, but it’s presumably as close as you ’re going to get in a gaming mouse for big hands.
As far as the wireless connectivity goes, the V2 Pro supports Razer’s low- quiescence HyperSpeed dongle as well as standard Bluetooth. Razer claims 70 hours of battery life with the low- quiescence dongle and a nicely emotional 120 hours via Bluetooth. The charging string is pleated and featherlight, which is a welcome touch.

The DeathAdder V2 Pro sports five onboard memory places, which retain settings similar as button programming and DPI. Still, you ’ll still need Synapse running to tweak certain parameters. The lighting and lift-off distance, for illustration, are n’t saved to the onboard memory. We can see this being a deal- swell for some, but we feel it’s an respectable situation overall.

Overall, the DeathAdder V2 Pro is a solid update to a important-favored gaming mouse. The shape has always been great, but the V2 Pro’s weight reduction and wireless connectivity make it the stylish DeathAdder yet. On balance, it’s the stylish gaming mouse for big hands in our book.

Not into wireless mice? The DeathAdder V2 has the same advancements as the V2 Pro at a lower price.

2. ZOWIE EC1

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Zowie’s EC1 shape is one of the most loved and copied in the gaming mouse world, and for a good reason. Like the Razer DeathAdder, the EC1 is a large ergonomic mouse, perfect for win grippers and large-handed likewise.

It has a wider grip range and is slightly lower twisted than the DeathAdder, but both are overall more analogous than different. One big difference, still, is that Zowie has n’t streamlined the EC1 as constantly. While the company has blazoned an EC1-C with a braided string and lower weight, it’s yet to really make its way to request. So, we ’re still recommending the aged EC1 for the time being.
The EC1 is a blast from the history, in both good and bad ways. On the positive side, it’s a refreshingly no- frills gaming mouse there’s no RGB, onboard biographies, or any motorists. It’s a purely draw-and- play mouse with four DPI (400, 800, 1600, and 3200) and three polling rate (100, 250, 1000 Hz) settings, all accessible from the mouse itself.
While the four DPI settings should be enough for utmost gamers, they will be a bit limited if you prefer in-between values. The EC1 presumably is n’t the gaming mouse for you if you ’re a niggler forultra-precise DPIsettings.However, you ’ll want a newer gaming mouse with more expansive software customization, If that’s the case.

That brings us to the downsides of the EC1. Originally, it’s a bit on the heavy side for a ultramodern gaming mouse. While 94 grams (3.31 oz) is n’t too bad, it’s still lower than ideal. Secondly, the fairly stiff rubber string pales compared to the featherlight braided immolations that are all the rage now. It’s nothing you ca n’t break with a good mouse bungee, but it’s surely outdated.

Despite that, however, there’s a lot to like about the Zowie EC1. It’s simple, has a tried-and- tested shape, and is priced competitively. It’s morning to show its age, but it’s still an excellent gaming mouse indeed in 2021. And if the weight and string are issues for you, keep an eye out for the EC1-C, which should hopefully be more readily available soon.

3. MICROSOFT PRO INTELLIMOUSE

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Zowie’s EC1 shape is one of the most loved and copied in the gaming mouse world, and for a good reason. Like the Razer DeathAdder, the EC1 is a large ergonomic mouse, perfect for win grippers and large-handed likewise.

It has a wider grip range and is slightly lower twisted than the DeathAdder, but both are overall more analogous than different. One big difference, still, is that Zowie has n’t streamlined the EC1 as constantly. While the company has blazoned an EC1-C with a braided string and lower weight, it’s yet to really make its way to request. So, we ’re still recommending the aged EC1 for the time being.
The EC1 is a blast from the history, in both good and bad ways. On the positive side, it’s a refreshingly no- frills gaming mouse there’s no RGB, onboard biographies, or any motorists. It’s a purely draw-and- play mouse with four DPI (400, 800, 1600, and 3200) and three polling rate (100, 250, 1000 Hz) settings, all accessible from the mouse itself.
While the four DPI settings should be enough for utmost gamers, they will be a bit limited if you prefer in-between values. The EC1 presumably is n’t the gaming mouse for you if you ’re a niggler forultra-precise DPIsettings.However, you ’ll want a newer gaming mouse with more expansive software customization, If that’s the case.

That brings us to the downsides of the EC1. Originally, it’s a bit on the heavy side for a ultramodern gaming mouse. While 94 grams (3.31 oz) is n’t too bad, it’s still lower than ideal. Secondly, the fairly stiff rubber string pales compared to the featherlight braided immolations that are all the rage now. It’s nothing you ca n’t break with a good mouse bungee, but it’s surely outdated.

Despite that, however, there’s a lot to like about the Zowie EC1. It’s simple, has a tried-and- tested shape, and is priced competitively. It’s morning to show its age, but it’s still an excellent gaming mouse indeed in 2021. And if the weight and string are issues for you, keep an eye out for the EC1-C, which should hopefully be more readily available soon.

4. STEELSERIES RIVAL 310

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SteelSeries has released numerous wide gaming mice over the times, and the Rival 310 is a solid addition to that list. The Rival 310 combines a high- quality detector and Intellimouse- deduced ergonomic design with a price that’s frequently around or below$ 40, making it an excellent value pick.

The Rival 710’s main claim to fame is the in- house TrueMove3 optic detector. SteelSeries claims that it offers low quiescence “ true 1 to 1 shadowing” with zero tackle mouse acceleration. The detector is frequently the most praised aspect of the Rival mice, so it’s presumably not just selling speak then. Either way, it’s at least on par with other top- quality detectors, so you ’re not immolating performance in the name of a lower price.
Other notable Tackle specs include switches designed in collaboration with Omron, with a rated lifetime of “ 50 million clicks”. Actually, 50 million is n’t as unique as it used to be, especially when Razer’s optic switches quote a 70-million click lifetime. But it’s another solid illustration of how the Rival 310 offers a lot of quality tackle for its current pricing.
There’s also onboard memory, which lets you use it without the software (SteelSeries Engine) once you ’ve set it up to your relish. Be to enjoy other SteelSeries RGB gear? The Rival 310 is PrismaSync- equipped, letting you attend your RGB lighting across it and other SteelSeries peripherals.

Overall, the SteelSeries Rival 310 offers quite a lot for the price. But that’s because the mouse is a bit old, having come out in 2017. That is n’t a bad thing, but it does mean that the string is amid-2010s resilient affair rather of the flexible paracord- style lines standard in 2021. You also do n’t get the slick PTFE bases of the Razer DeathAdder V2 Pro.

So it’s not perfect and is beginning to show its age. But there’s still a lot to like about the Rival 310, especially if you want a gaming mouse that’sextra-wide at the reverse. The fact that it’s lower than$ 50 makes it all the better.

5. LOGITECH G604

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Want a large gaming mouse that uses the redundant real estate to add further buttons? Well, also the Logitech G604 is for you. Unlike the other gaming mice on this list, the G604 goes for the maximalist approach, boasting 15 programmable buttons on its large body.

You get six thumb buttons, DPI over and down, and mouse wheel left and right clicks alongside the standard five mousebuttons.However, you can collude a G Shift button that gives you access to an redundant subcaste of tapes when held down ( much like the Function key on a keyboard), If 15 programmable functions are n’t enough.
You also get anon-programmable wheel mode toggle button below the scroll wheel. This lets you choose between the G604’s two mouse wheel modes. One offers you a footloose scroll that’s great for scrolling through long menus or websites, while the other is a slower scroll with easily defined notches if you want perfection.
Still, also this is the perfect gaming mouse for you, If you ’re an MMO or MOBA gamer. Productivity-inclined druggies may also enjoy the G604, as Logitech’s G Mecca software lets you collude buttons to your favored crucial combinations or macros.

It’s not each about the redundant buttons, however. The G604 boasts Logitech’s rearmost Idol 25K detector ( boasting a honestly insane DPI outside) and the company’s Lightspeed wireless technology for a low- quiescence wireless gaming experience. So the G604 will still do the job indeed in games where you do n’t need those redundant thumb buttons.

Still, the 135 gram (4.76 oz) weight will probably be an issue for further competitive FPS gamers. The AA battery powering the G604 is to condemn for the redundant weight, but it does mean an emotional 240-hour battery life. So there’s at least an upside to the G604’s heft.

Overall, the Logitech G604 is a protean computer mouse that will appeal to both gamers and professionals. It covers a lot of bases, whether you need the redundant buttons for MMO binds or just want 240 hours of wireless use for working on the go.

These are the best gaming mouse for large hands.